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Severe Brain Injuries May Lead to ADHD

Posted in Brain injuries,Traumatic Brain Injuries on March 26, 2018

Although children who have sustained a severe head injury may appear to have fully recovered, a recent study suggests that children may still be at risk for developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder by time they reach their teenage years.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic condition that often times begins in childhood and can continue into adulthood. Symptoms of ADHD include aggression, excitability, fidgeting, hyperactivity, impulsivity, irritability, lack of restraint, persistent repetition of words or actions, absent-mindedness, difficulty focusing, forgetfulness, short attention span, problems paying attention, anger, anxiety, boredom, mood swings, depression, and learning disabilities.

Treatment can help control this condition, but it cannot be cured. Some treatments include support groups, anger management, behavioral therapy, psychoeducation, stimulants, antihypertensive drug, or seeing a specialist.

The new study, conducted by psychologists, concludes that children who experience a severe TBI between the ages of 3 and 7 are 3.5 times more likely to develop ADHD by time they are a teenager. ADHD is the most common psychiatric disorder diagnosed in children with a previous brain injury.

Although this new study sheds some light on the connection between TBI and ADHD, it still isn’t clear whether or not ADHD is present at the time of the injury, or if it develops over time.

The brain is a very delicate organ and with little injury, the brain may not be able to function as well. Every brain injury case is different. If your child has suffered a brain injury, be sure to have regular check-ups to catch any future issues and discuss the possibility of filing a personal injury claim with a qualified West Virginia brain injury lawyer if another’s negligence contributed to your child’s TBI.